Best In Show

Who would actually sit down and watch a dog show on TV? Not Rin Tin Tin, but the competitions with the parading and the judging and the Best In Show.  The answer to that question is “me”.  I happened upon it one Thanksgiving Day and was immediately drawn in.  Fascinated even.  It took me aContinue reading

Love It? Break It.

Whether it’s a screenplay or a product or a business model, it’s not enough that the thing works; we have to understand why it works. Only then do we get to apply that knowledge to newer (and better) screenplays and products and business models. But here’s the rub: to learn the ‘why’, we sometimes have to break the thing that works.

Rider or Owner?

True story:  guy takes his motorcycle to a shop for an oil change.  After chatting with the man, the mechanic looks at the bike, its pristine condition, and its low mileage and says to the man, “Oh, you’re not a motorcycle rider, you’re a motorcycle owner.” Now, when it comes to takeaways from this un-fable,Continue reading

Gangnam Content Style

If you have had any exposure to TV or the Internet in the last few weeks, you’ve likely seen a rotund, well-dressed Asian man dancing as if he were riding an invisible pony. As you probably know, his name is Psy, a South Korean performer whose hit “Gangnam Style” (destined to be the “Macarena” ofContinue reading

Today Is Veteran’s Day

[a piece I wrote a few years back] I saw him several times as I moved from aisle to aisle at the grocery store.  I would steal a glance as I moved from ‘Cookies/Snacks/Chips’ to ‘Household Items/Stationary’, then back to ‘Bread/Rolls.’ An older, heavy-set man, fully occupying a Hoveround cart, wearing a blue cap withContinue reading

Matthew Maxim — Update!

A few weeks ago, I shared with you a maxim I’ve found to be true, useful, and readily applicable: “I will take ‘no’ for answer; I won’t take ‘no answer’ for an answer.” In that post, I cited a prospective Client who showed interest in hiring me as a creative consultant, but then went offContinue reading

Matthew Maxim #32

To make it in sales (and we’re all salesfolk on one level or another, agreed?), ‘no’ must be an acceptable answer. You don’t have to like it– you shouldn’t like it– but you must be able to roll with it and move on.

But what about when there’s no response? Do you assume the answer is ‘no’ and move on? Or do you keep pushing?

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